Profile Draft #1 (481)

Blanding Turtle

Ashley Stewart

Fleming College

The Blanding’s Turtle Emydoidea blandingii, often have tan or yellow markings. These may be reduced or absent in some turtles. This species is one of several endangered native turtles that people remove illegally from the wild for use as food or pets (Climate Change Canada, 2018). Additionally the Blanding Turtle have some interesting breeding habits, reproduction cycle, and common treats that affect their lives. 

(Climate Change Canada, 2018)
(Blanding’s turtle, n.d.)

Breeding Habits 

In Canada, they can be found around the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River region of Ontario. The turtles are in small isolated populations occurring in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Blanding’s turtles, which inhabit shallow lakes, ponds and wetlands with clean water and mucky bottoms, make the largest overland movement of any Ontario turtles, travelling up to several kilometres between summer habitat and nesting sites or overwintering habitat (Blanding’s Turtle: Species Information. n.d.). These turtles like to hang around wetlands like; marshes and bogs. 

In fact, as the weather gets colder Blanding’s turtles will hibernation in marshes and bogs, burying themselves in the soft, mucky bottom of one of theses wetlands with low vegetation. Female Blanding’s turtles require terrestrial nesting habitats where soil has little to no vegetation. The lack of vegetation means less food available and therefore fewer potential predators in the vicinity (Grey. E, n.d.).

(Earth Rangers, 2016)

Reproduction 

Reproduction cycle for Blanding’s turtles realizes on the female picking their partner, the male never has a choice on who they would like to repopulate with. Even though the female has all the control at the beginning, the male will take over control later on. Blanding’s turtles are mostly polyandrous, meaning that females have more than one mate. It’s rare for a female to only have a single mate (Even, G. n.d.). Matting can either take place onshore, near a wetland or in the water. Along with only matting during the night.

(Admin, 2013)

Threats 

The species that are affecting Blanding’s turtles are; the Northern Short-Tailed Shrew, Striped Skunks, Opossum,  Raccoon, and North American River Otter. Even Gray explains how Northern Short-Tailed Shrews tend to prey on emerging hatchling Blanding’s turtles. While Striped Skunks, Opossums, Raccoons, and Foxes also prey on the nests (Grey, E. n.d.). Although theses species have an impact on the Blanding’s turtles, they aren’t the biggest problem threatening these turtles.

As research shows about 40% of all freshwater turtles worldwide are threatened, with seven of the eight Ontario species endangered, threatened or of special concern (Earth Rangers, 2016). Making habitat loss perhaps the greatest threat facing Blanding’s turtles. People aren’t just taking over the habitats of turtles, vehicles also play a part in the engagement of Blanding turtles and overall all turtles. Vehicles on roads are another serious threat, particularly to females that are in search of, or returning from, nesting sites (Climate Change Canada, 2018).

References 

Admin. (2013, July 1). Blanding’s Turtle Blues. Retrieved from https://www.rideauwildlife.org/blandings-turtle-blues/.

Alamenciak, T. Sherman, J. (n.d.). Endangered Ontario: The turtle that toppled turbines. Retrieved from https://www.tvo.org/article/endangered-ontario-the-turtle-that-toppled-turbines.

Blanding’s turtle. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/what-we-do/resource-centre/featured-species/reptiles-and-amphibians/blandings-turtle.html.

Blanding’s Turtle: Species Information. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ontarionature.org/programs/citizen-science/reptile-amphibian-atlas/blandings-turtle/.

Climate Change Canada. (2018, December 21). Government of Canada. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/species-risk-public-registry/recovery-strategies/blandings-turtle-2018.html.

Earth Rangers. (2016, November 3). Blanding’s Turtle Update: Getting a Helping Hand: Earth Rangers Wild Wire Blog. Retrieved from https://www.earthrangers.com/wildwire/take-action/blandings-turtle-update-getting-a-helping-hand/.

Earth Rangers. (2016, November 3). Blanding’s Turtle: Earth Rangers Wild Wire Blog. Retrieved from https://www.earthrangers.com/wildwire/take-action/blandings-turtle-2/.

Grey, E. (n.d.). Emydoidea blandingii (Blanding’s Turtle). Retrieved from https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Emydoidea_blandingii/.

Profile Draft #2 (498)

Blanding Turtle

Ashley Stewart

Fleming College

The Blanding’s Turtle, Emydoidea blandingii, a species that is endangered in some parts of Canada. These turtles often have tan or yellow markings although these may be reduced or absent in some turtles. This species is one of several endangered native turtles that people remove illegally from the wild for use as food or pets (Climate Change Canada, 2018). Additionally the Blanding Turtle has interesting breeding habits, reproduction cycle, and common threats that affect their lives. 

(Climate Change Canada, 2018)
(Blanding’s turtle, n.d.)

Breeding Habits 

In Canada, they can be found around the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River region of Ontario. The turtles are in small isolated populations occurring in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Blanding’s turtles, which inhabit shallow lakes, ponds and wetlands with clean water and mucky bottoms, make the largest overland movement of any Ontario turtles, travelling up to several kilometres between summer habitats and nesting sites or overwintering habitats (Blanding’s Turtle: Species Information. n.d.). These turtles like to hang around wetlands such as marshes and bogs. 

In fact, as the weather gets colder Blanding’s turtles prefer to hibernate in marshes and bogs, burying themselves in the soft, mucky bottom of one of theses wetlands with low vegetation. Female Blanding’s turtles require terrestrial nesting habitats where soil has little to no vegetation. The lack of vegetation means less food available and therefore fewer potential predators in the vicinity (Grey. E, n.d.).

  (Earth Rangers, 2016)

Reproduction 

Reproduction cycle for Blanding’s turtles realizes on the female picking their partner, the male never has a choice on who they would like to repopulate with. Even though the female has all the control at the beginning, the male will take over control later on. Blanding’s turtles are mostly polyandrous, meaning that females have more than one mate. It’s rare for a female to only have a single mate (Even, G. n.d.). Matting can either take place on shore, near a wetland, or in the water. Along with only matting during the night.      

(Admin, 2013)

Threats 

The species that are affecting Blanding’s turtles are; the Northern Short-Tailed Shrew, Striped Skunks, Opossum,  Raccoon, and North American River Otter. Even Gray explains how Northern Short-Tailed Shrews tend to prey on emerging hatchling Blanding’s turtles. While Striped Skunks, Opossums, Raccoons, and Foxes also prey on the nests (Grey, E. n.d.). Although these species have an impact on the Blanding’s turtles, they aren’t the biggest problem threatening these turtles.      

As research shows about fourthy percent of all freshwater turtles worldwide are threatened, with seven of the eight Ontario species endangered, threatened or of special concern (Earth Rangers, 2016). Making habitat loss perhaps the greatest threat facing Blanding’s turtles. People aren’t just taking over the habitats of turtles, vehicles also play a part in the engagement of Blanding turtles and overall all turtles. Vehicles on roads are another serious threat, particularly to females that are in search of, or returning from, nesting sites (Climate Change Canada, 2018).

References 

Admin. (2013, July 1). Blanding’s Turtle Blues. Retrieved from https://www.rideauwildlife.org/blandings-turtle-blues/.

Alamenciak, T. Sherman, J. (n.d.). Endangered Ontario: The turtle that toppled turbines. Retrieved from https://www.tvo.org/article/endangered-ontario-the-turtle-that-toppled-turbines.

Blanding’s turtle. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/what-we-do/resource-centre/featured-species/reptiles-and-amphibians/blandings-turtle.html.

Blanding’s Turtle: Species Information. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ontarionature.org/programs/citizen-science/reptile-amphibian-atlas/blandings-turtle/.

Climate Change Canada. (2018, December 21). Government of Canada. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/species-risk-public-registry/recovery-strategies/blandings-turtle-2018.html.

Earth Rangers. (2016, November 3). Blanding’s Turtle Update: Getting a Helping Hand: Earth Rangers Wild Wire Blog. Retrieved from https://www.earthrangers.com/wildwire/take-action/blandings-turtle-update-getting-a-helping-hand/.

Earth Rangers. (2016, November 3). Blanding’s Turtle: Earth Rangers Wild Wire Blog. Retrieved from https://www.earthrangers.com/wildwire/take-action/blandings-turtle-2/.

Grey, E. (n.d.). Emydoidea blandingii (Blanding’s Turtle). Retrieved from https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Emydoidea_blandingii/.

Blanding’s Turtle (511)

Blanding’s Turtle

Ashley Stewart

Fleming College

The Blanding’s Turtle, ​Emydoidea blandingii,​ a species that is endangered in some parts of Canada. These turtles often have tan or yellow markings although these may be absent or reduced in some turtles. This species is one of several endangered native turtles that people remove illegally from the wild for use as food or pets (Climate Change Canada, 2018). Additionally, the Blanding Turtle has intriguing breeding habits, reproduction cycles, and common threats that affect their lives.

(​Blanding’s turtle, n.d.) 
(Climate Change Canada, 2018)

Breeding Habits

In Canada, they can be found around the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River region of Ontario. “Blanding Turtles make the largest overland movement of any Ontario turtles, travelling up to several kilometres between summer habitats and nesting sites or overwintering habitats” (Blanding’s Turtle: Species Information. n.d.). They are in small isolated populations occurring in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Blanding’s turtles like to hang around wetlands such as marshes and bogs. They will inhabit shallow lakes, ponds and wetlands when finding a place to stay. These turtles will go more to clean bodies of water with mucky bottoms.

In fact, as the weather gets colder Blanding’s turtles prefer to hibernate in marshes and bogs, burying themselves in the soft, mucky bottom of one of theses wetlands with low vegetation. “Female Blanding’s turtles require terrestrial nesting habitats where soil has little to no vegetation. The lack of vegetation means less food available and therefore fewer potential predators in the vicinity” (Grey, n.d.).

Reproduction

The reproduction cycle for Blanding’s turtles realizes on the female picking their partner, the male never has a choice on who they would like to repopulate with. Even though the female has all the control at the beginning, the male will take over control later on. Blanding’s turtles are mostly polyandrous, meaning that females have more than one mate. It’s rare for a female to only have a single mate (Gray, n.d.). Matting can either take place onshore, near a wetland or in the water, although matting will always take place during the night.

(Earth Rangers, 2016)

Threats

The species that are affecting Blanding’s turtles are; the Northern Short-Tailed Shrew, Striped Skunks, Opossum, Raccoon, and North American River Otter. Even Gray explains how Northern Short-Tailed Shrews tend to prey on emerging hatchling Blanding’s turtles. While Striped Skunks, Opossums, Raccoons, and Foxes will prey on the nests before they hatch. (Grey, n.d.). Although these species have an impact on the Blanding’s turtles, they aren’t the biggest problem threatening these turtles.

As research shows about 40 percent of all freshwater turtles worldwide are threatened, with seven of the eight Ontario species endangered, threatened or of special concern (Earth Rangers, 2016). Making habitat loss perhaps the greatest threat facing Blanding’s turtles. People aren’t just taking over the habitats of turtles, vehicles also play a part in the engagement of Blanding turtles and overall all turtles. Vehicles on roads are another serious threat, particularly to females that are in search of, or returning from, nesting sites (Climate Change Canada, 2018).

​(Admin, 2013)

References

Admin. (2013, July 1). Blanding’s Turtle Blues. Retrieved from https://www.rideauwildlife.org/blandings-turtle-blues/.

Alamenciak, T. Sherman, J. (n.d.). Endangered Ontario: The turtle that toppled turbines. Retrieved from https://www.tvo.org/article/endangered-ontario-the-turtle-that-toppled-turbines.

Blanding’s turtle. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/what-we-do/resource-centre/featured-species/reptiles- and-amphibians/blandings-turtle.html.

Blanding’s Turtle: Species Information. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ontarionature.org/programs/citizen-science/reptile-amphibian-atlas/blandings-turtle/.

Climate Change Canada. (2018, December 21). Government of Canada. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/species-risk-public-registr y/recovery-strategies/blandings-turtle-2018.html.

Earth Rangers. (2016, November 3). Blanding’s Turtle Update: Getting a Helping Hand: Earth Rangers Wild Wire Blog. Retrieved from https://www.earthrangers.com/wildwire/take-action/blandings-turtle-update-getting-a-helpi ng-hand/.

Earth Rangers. (2016, November 3). Blanding’s Turtle: Earth Rangers Wild Wire Blog. Retrieved from https://www.earthrangers.com/wildwire/take-action/blandings-turtle-2/.

Grey, E. (n.d.). Emydoidea blandingii (Blanding’s Turtle). Retrieved from https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Emydoidea_blandingii/.

Join the Conversation

5 Comments

  1. Your draft is very nice to read. Easy to get through and intriguing. Your draft has all the necessary information. Well written for a college audience. More quantitative detail would improve the writing level. Solid intro but could use more intriguing words.
    Look beautiful and the page flows well. This is a detached paper and it does well to carry your intent.

  2. Firstly a strength is the awareness of the credibility of the information you attained and an area of improvement would be to believe in your ability. Your subject is clearly focused and well informed. The draft is very engaging because of the knowledge that is displayed in a confident manner. The presentation is well constructed and provides rich and vivid detail especially with the high quality photographs. The perspective is correct for a reasarch paper helps me gain insight to the life of the Blanding Turtle.

    Bradley 🙂 xoxo

  3. Great job!!! Your profile is very well focused and to the point. You managed to convey important and interesting information in an entertaining way. You did, however, have a few spelling errors, in particular there is a wrong word in the first sentence of your reproduction paragraph.

  4. It’s a very well written profile Ashley! I learned a lot reading it, and the visuals were very helpful. The only criticisms I could send your way would be some grammar and spelling mistakes that I’d be more than happy to sit down with you and help you fix! Very good detail, and I’m actually quite impressed with the quality of the work! Good job! 🙂

  5. Species Profile draft number two. Your profile is very well written and holds a very good format. It is also extremely informational, I think you did your research and it shows. Your knowledge of this turtle is easily seen, good work. Keep it up 🙂

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